National Celiac Disease Awareness Day….September 13th, 2010

You may have noticed that restaurants, grocery stores, maybe even friends and family are becoming more aware of celiac disease and gluten allergies. Here is more proof that even the government is recognizing it as a real disease that deserves their attention. Monday, September 13th, 2010 is National Celiac Disease Awareness Day….Yay! Here is the resolution, with its preamble, which reads as follows: S. Res. 605

Whereas celiac disease affects approximately 1 in every 130 people in the United States, for a total of 3,000,000 people;

Whereas the majority of people with celiac disease have yet to be diagnosed;

Whereas celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is classified as both an autoimmune condition and a genetic condition;

Whereas celiac disease causes damage to the lining of the small intestine, which results in overall malnutrition;

Whereas when a person with celiac disease consumes foods that contain certain protein fractions, that person suffers a cell-mediated immune response that damages the villi of the small intestine, interfering with the absorption of nutrients in food and the effectiveness of medications;

Whereas such problematic protein fractions are found in wheat, barley, rye, and oats, which are used to produce many foods, medications, and vitamins;

Whereas because celiac disease is a genetic disease, there is an increased incidence of celiac disease in families with a known history of celiac disease;

Whereas celiac disease is underdiagnosed because the symptoms can be attributed to other conditions and are easily overlooked by doctors and patients;

Whereas as recently as 2000, the average person with celiac disease waited 11 years for a correct diagnosis;

Whereas 1/2 of all people with celiac disease do not show symptoms of the disease;

Whereas celiac disease is diagnosed by tests that measure the blood for abnormally high levels of the antibodies of immunoglobulin A, anti-tissue transglutaminase, and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies;

Whereas celiac disease can be treated only by implementing a diet free of wheat, barley, rye, and oats, often called a “gluten-free diet”;

Whereas a delay in the diagnosis of celiac disease can result in damage to the small intestine, which leads to an increased risk for malnutrition, anemia, lymphoma, adenocarcinoma, osteoporosis, miscarriage, congenital malformation, short stature, and disorders of skin and other organs;

Whereas celiac disease is linked to many autoimmune disorders, including thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes, liver disease, collagen vascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren’s syndrome;

Whereas the connection between celiac disease and diet was first established by Dr. Samuel Gee, who wrote, “if the patient can be cured at all, it must be by means of diet”
Whereas the Senate is an institution that can raise awareness in the general public and the medical community of celiac disease: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Senate–

(1) designates September 13, 2010, as “National Celiac Disease Awareness Day”;

(2) recognizes that all people of the United States should become more informed and aware of celiac disease;

(3) calls upon the people of the United States to observe National Celiac Disease Awareness Day with appropriate ceremonies and activities; and

(4) respectfully requests the Secretary of the Senate to transmit a copy of this resolution to the Celiac Sprue Association, the American Celiac Society, and the Celiac Disease Foundation.
Inspired by an old friend, I decided to put my cooking skills to the test and design my own Chicken Pot Pie recipe. Back in our gluten filled days, my husband and I used to make chicken pot pies using the old Bisquick mix at least once a week. I hope this pot pie will taste as good as it looks!
Chicken Pot Pie-8-29-46
Ingredients:
1 Gluten Free Pantry Pie Crust Mix
1 cup Organic Chicken Broth
1 16 oz. pkg cooked mixed veggies
1 cup cooked organic chicken, cut into cubes
½ cup mixed blend rice cheese
1 potato
2 T GF flour
¼ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
¼ tsp baking Powder
2 T sugar
10 Tbs. butter
10 T butter-flavored shortening (I used more butter)
2 eggs
2 T cold water
3 tsp cider vinegar

Directions:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
Make Gluten Free Pie Crust according to directions on the box.
You will be making 4- 8” pie crusts. After the dough is made, you will divide in half and freeze half for later use.
Layer 1- 8” uncooked pie crust into a pie dish.
Prepare filling.
Wash and cut up potato into small cubes. Boil in water for 10 minutes or until softened.
In a sauce pan, add chicken broth, butter and gluten free flour. Simmer for 10 minutes until thickened. Add salt and pepper to taste.
Stir in chicken, cooked potatoes and vegetables.
Place soup mixture into uncooked pie crust.
Top with cheese.
Cover with second pie crust. Seal and flute edges. Slit the top in several places.
Set on a baking sheet and bake for 40-45 minutes.
The top should be browned and insides bubbling through slits.
Cool and serve.

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